My Life As An Esperanto Volunteer

During Christmas, I returned home and met some friends who asked I’m up to nowadays. “Well,” I said, “I’m working in an Esperanto office.” They didn’t believe it. What is Esperanto? Why would anyone want to speak it? Is it some sort of cult? Why don’t you just speak English, the language that everyone speaks? Is Esperanto even a real language? Have I lost my mind? Continue reading “My Life As An Esperanto Volunteer”

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A Guide To The Main International Esperanto Events

So let’s say you’re learning Esperanto and it’s going well. In fact it’s going so well that you want to speak it with lots of people, not just those in your local group (if there even is one). Instead you want to go abroad to an international Esperanto event, but you don’t know which one. There is a complete list of all Esperanto events in the world here, but as you can see there’s a huge number. I had the exact same problem trying to figure out which of the alaphbet soup of Esperanto events were worth going to, so I’ve made a list of the main ones to help make it easier for you.  I’ll focus on the ones I have gone to for obvious reasons. Continue reading “A Guide To The Main International Esperanto Events”

What To Expect At Your First International Esperanto Event

Just over a year ago, I went to my very first international Esperanto event and I can still remember how nervous I was. I was new to the language so I had no idea what to expect. I had been learning it for six months but had never spoken it with anyone else yet. I eventually mustered up the courage to book tickets to an event, but I was flying completely blind. I was afraid that no one else would turn up or it might even be a scam. As it turns out, it was a fantastic event where I made lots of friends and had a brilliant time.

There are probably a lot of Esperanto learners in a similar position. You’ve been practicising Esperanto on Duolingo and want to speak it but don’t know what the events are like. It’s a bit of a commitment to go to an event as they are usually abroad and cost several hundred euro. So I’ll give you a breakdown of what to expect. Continue reading “What To Expect At Your First International Esperanto Event”

Ido Not

As readers of this blog may know, I’m a big fan of Esperanto and how it simplifies language to make it more logical and easier to learn. However, some people thought this could be taken a step further and Esperanto itself could be reformed and improved. This reformed language is called Ido (which means offspring in Esperanto) and aimed to replace Esperanto as the main international language. This became known as “The Schism” and like all splits it was incredibly divisive and bitter, leading to a lot of vitriol being thrown around. Continue reading “Ido Not”

The Duty Of Every Intellectual Man And Woman To Learn Esperanto (1909)

Continuing on from yesterdays post, I have been sharing articles from The North American Review about Esperanto from 1906-9. These offer a fascinating insight into the movement in its early days and the hopes and dreams of its early advocates. Let’s continue this walk through history. Continue reading “The Duty Of Every Intellectual Man And Woman To Learn Esperanto (1909)”

The Progress And Prospects Of Esperanto (1907)

I’ve always had a love of history so the area of Esperanto history is something I find fascinating. It’s interesting to read articles from a hundred years ago about, what at the time, was a new invention. The late 19th and early 20th century was a time full of new inventions and advances as the world was changing beyond recognition. All areas of life were undergoing rapid change and many wondered if language too would be subject to the modernisation that so many other fields experienced. It is incredible to look back at the early hopes and uncertainties people had towards Esperanto. Who knew what would happen with the language? Would it genuinely become a major world language or was it just a passing fad that would quickly be forgotten? Continue reading “The Progress And Prospects Of Esperanto (1907)”

Esperanto’s Appeal – What It May Mean For Ireland (1926)

Ireland has never had a large Esperanto community, probably due to the dominance of English and our remoteness from other cultures, languages and people. However, during the early days of Esperanto, no one knew whether the language would take off or just be a passing fad. There was a great deal of interest in the language and discussion in many papers. Many people wondered if it would change their lives the way so many other new inventions and discoveries had. I have come across a few articles in the Irish Times during the 1920s that I’ll share with you now. Continue reading “Esperanto’s Appeal – What It May Mean For Ireland (1926)”