Say It Isn’t So

Few economists openly admit to believing in Say’s Law anymore. It is generally considered a relic of the past, a once dominant theory that had faded away. Although it was prominent in the 19th century, it was swept away in the Keynesian revolution like so much of Classical economics. However, economic theories never die. Say’s Law lives on in conservatives think tanks like the Heritage Foundation and when Marco Rubio (who many favour as the next Republican candidate for President) rose to reply to Obama’s State of the Union address, it was Say’s Law he invoked. Even in the world of economics, some economists unconsciously channel the spirit of Say when they preach about the worries of crowding out and through Walras’ Law which is just a weak version of Say’s. This year’s joint winner of the (pretend) Nobel Prize in Economics Eugene Fama constructed an argument against government stimulus (unconsciously) based more or less on Say’s Law. Continue reading “Say It Isn’t So”


Debunking The Broken Window Fallacy

One day a boy was playing football when he accidently broke a window. Rather than get mad, the people shrugged their shoulders and said breaking windows is good for the economy. After all, if no windows were broken, then all the glaziers would be out of a job. By breaking the window, the boy ensured money would be spent on repairs, thereby ensuring someone kept their job and giving the window making business a boost. However, at this point Bastist in his seminal essay “That Which Is Seen And That Which Is Not Seen” jumps in to point out why this is a fallacy. While we see the money spent on repairing the window, we don’t see what would have happened had the window not been broken. Instead of repairing the window, the money could have been spent on a new pair of shoes. So while the glazier is better off, we don’t see the people who are worse off as a result. Continue reading “Debunking The Broken Window Fallacy”