How To Immerse Yourself In Esperanto

Have you just finished Duolingo or another Esperanto course and are now wondering what to do next? Are you trying to figure out how to further advance and develop your skills? Do you want to put the textbooks behind you and actually use the language? If so, here is a handy guide of where to go and what to do next to fully use Esperanto and dive into the community. Continue reading “How To Immerse Yourself In Esperanto”

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Using An Anime Computer Game To Teach Esperanto? I Interviewed The Publishers To Find Out More

What would be a good way to get people interested in Esperanto and help them learn the language? This is a question as old as the language itself and there is no shortage of proposals. We’re all familiar with Duolingo’s “gamified” system of learning and I’ve heard people dreaming of a role-playing game set in an Esperanto speaking world where the player gradually learns vocabulary from their surroundings. I thought this was a great idea but just wishful thinking, surely it would cost too much and no developer would be interested?

Imagine my surprise when I found out that a developer was in fact interested. The Expression: Amrilato is an anime computer game where the main character gets transported to an Esperanto speaking world and players are gradually taught Esperanto as they play. Esperanto isn’t just a background feature, it is a core part of the game players must engage with to progress. Interestingly, the game is aimed at anime fans, not specifically Esperantists and all the news and discussion about the game has taken place in the wider anime community. It was originally developed in Japanese by SukeraSparo (whose name is the Esperanto words for sugar and Sparidae, a type of fish) and translated into English by MangaGamer.

As you can imagine, I am very excited about this and contacted the developers to find out more. Continue reading “Using An Anime Computer Game To Teach Esperanto? I Interviewed The Publishers To Find Out More”

Why is Esperanto more popular in some regions than in others?

Why is Esperanto more popular in some countries than in others? Why is the community vibrant in some regions yet barely active in others? Why is the movement strongest in Europe and East Asia but weakest in Africa and Central Asia? Why is it far more popular in Brazil than the rest of South America? Continue reading “Why is Esperanto more popular in some regions than in others?”

Why Esperanto won’t diverge into dialects

A criticism I’ve heard a few times about Esperanto is that it can’t become a universal language, because it would diverge into separate dialects. The argument goes like this: even if everyone in the world could speak Esperanto, the language wouldn’t succeed because it would inevitably split into several mutually incomprehensible languages and we would be back where we started. Some people seem to believe that all languages inevitably evolve and diverge until they become unrecognisable and the divergence of Latin into the Romance languages is usually the example given. Continue reading “Why Esperanto won’t diverge into dialects”

Why We Should Teach Esperanto In School

Why do we teach foreign languages in school? Is it because foreign languages are essential job skills students will need when they join the workforce? Is it a crucial life skill we need in society? Most of my former classmates never used the language after they graduated and soon forget most of what they learned. Few visit a country where the language is spoken and even then, they mainly use English. Students rarely read books in a foreign language or watch foreign language films without English subtitles, during or after school. Even after years of study, few can speak the language with much skill or talent.

So, is teaching foreign languages a waste of time? If most students don’t reach a comfortable level and rarely use it, what’s the point? I believe that even if students never use the language, it still is useful. Continue reading “Why We Should Teach Esperanto In School”

Myths About Esperanto And Esperantists

In online language learning communities, if you decide to learn a new language, you’re bound to get support and praise. However, there is one exception to this. If you declare you want to learn German, Russian or Uzbek etc you will receive encouragement and if someone doesn’t like those languages, they’ll keep their opinion to themselves. However, this rule doesn’t apply to Esperanto. If someone doesn’t like Esperanto, they’ll definitely let you know, in fact they’ll even tell you that Esperantists are such rude people that they brought the hostility on themselves.

I’ve never seen a Reddit comment section about Esperanto that didn’t involve Esperantists having to defend themselves and justify their actions. Continue reading “Myths About Esperanto And Esperantists”

Imagine if Esperantists had our own currency

Esperanto is an international language, but do we need an international currency? At every congress, people come from many different countries to use a common language, but could they also use a common currency? Nowadays there is a massive growth in crypto-currencies like Bitcoin and that has me thinking. What if the Esperanto community had a currency? Continue reading “Imagine if Esperantists had our own currency”