An Atheist Reads The Book Of Job: God Responds But Doesn’t Answer

So after the debate I covered last time between Job and his 3 “friends” (if you can call them that) there is a shift in the Book of Job. The first post was about questions of morality and why bad things happen to good people and in this post God shows up to give his response. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The Book Of Job: God Responds But Doesn’t Answer”

An Atheist Reads The Book of Esther: Treat Others As They Would Treat You

The book of Esther is a short book and a quick read (which is a big plus when reading the Bible). Interestingly, it is one of the few books not set in Israel and one of the only that doesn’t mention God. In contrast to almost every other story in the Bible, God doesn’t actually do anything in Esther, instead the approach is very humanist, the people must solve their own problems. In fact, God isn’t even mentioned in the book! Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The Book of Esther: Treat Others As They Would Treat You”

An Atheist Reads The Bible: The Importance Of Racial Purity

The books of Ezra and Nehemiah are rather dull books, focusing mainly on administration. They are very short and not much really happens in them, but they are important milestones. The book of Kings ends with the destruction of Israel and the deportation of the Israelites, so it is natural that these books cover their return from exile. They also mark the end of the “historical” section of the Old Testament (even if it was riddled with inaccuracies) and the shift towards the speeches and poems of prophets. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The Bible: The Importance Of Racial Purity”

An Atheist Reads The Book of Chronicles: The Most Unnecessary Book In The Bible

To be honest, I don’t see the point of the first and second book of Chronicles. Sure I don’t have much respect for the rest of the Bible, but these two books are particularly pointless. Not because the stories are any worse than the other parts, but because we’ve already heard them. The Book of Chronicles is just a summary of the Books of Samuel and Kings, like those old tv shows that would take clips from old episodes and combine them together to make a “new” episode. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The Book of Chronicles: The Most Unnecessary Book In The Bible”

An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book Of Kings: The Miracles of Elijah and the Fall of Israel

Christians take it for granted that Jesus is divine for many reasons, such as the miracles he performed. Yet reading the Bible, the miracles of Jesus don’t seem too out of the ordinary. In fact long before Jesus, there was Elijah who performed many miracles and even raised the dead before ascending into heaven. So who was this Elijah? Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book Of Kings: The Miracles of Elijah and the Fall of Israel”

An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book of Samuel: The Bizarre Justice Of God

The 2nd book of Samuel picks up where the 1st one finished, with David hearing of the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan. Upon hearing this, he and all his men tear off their clothes and start weeping. He is told this by an Amalekite, who for unexplained reasons was wandering through the battlefield when he started chatting to Saul (why? Shouldn’t they be enemies?), who asked him to kill him (despite the Bible just saying that Saul killed himself). So the Amalekite mercy kills the wounded Saul brings his crown to David. Why? Out of all the people in the land, why did the Amalekite choose David? Why not sell it or return to his own king? David thanks the stranger who gave him this crucial news and the crown by having him executed. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book of Samuel: The Bizarre Justice Of God”

An Atheist Reads The 1st Book Of Samuel: The Fall Of Saul And The Rise Of David

While the first half of the 1st Book of Samuel was about the rise of Samuel and how Saul became king, the second half is about Saul’s decline and fall, and the rise of David. However, this doesn’t happen in a straight forward way, instead the way is littered with massacres, murder and betrayal. The main characters act more like mafia dons than divinely blessed heroes. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The 1st Book Of Samuel: The Fall Of Saul And The Rise Of David”