An Atheist Reads The Book Of Job: God Responds But Doesn’t Answer

So after the debate I covered last time between Job and his 3 “friends” (if you can call them that) there is a shift in the Book of Job. The first post was about questions of morality and why bad things happen to good people and in this post God shows up to give his response. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The Book Of Job: God Responds But Doesn’t Answer”

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An Atheist Reads The Bible: The Importance Of Racial Purity

The books of Ezra and Nehemiah are rather dull books, focusing mainly on administration. They are very short and not much really happens in them, but they are important milestones. The book of Kings ends with the destruction of Israel and the deportation of the Israelites, so it is natural that these books cover their return from exile. They also mark the end of the “historical” section of the Old Testament (even if it was riddled with inaccuracies) and the shift towards the speeches and poems of prophets. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The Bible: The Importance Of Racial Purity”

An Atheist Reads The Book of Chronicles: The Most Unnecessary Book In The Bible

To be honest, I don’t see the point of the first and second book of Chronicles. Sure I don’t have much respect for the rest of the Bible, but these two books are particularly pointless. Not because the stories are any worse than the other parts, but because we’ve already heard them. The Book of Chronicles is just a summary of the Books of Samuel and Kings, like those old tv shows that would take clips from old episodes and combine them together to make a “new” episode. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The Book of Chronicles: The Most Unnecessary Book In The Bible”

An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book Of Kings: The Miracles of Elijah and the Fall of Israel

Christians take it for granted that Jesus is divine for many reasons, such as the miracles he performed. Yet reading the Bible, the miracles of Jesus don’t seem too out of the ordinary. In fact long before Jesus, there was Elijah who performed many miracles and even raised the dead before ascending into heaven. So who was this Elijah? Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book Of Kings: The Miracles of Elijah and the Fall of Israel”

An Atheist Reads The 1st Book of Kings: God Doesn’t Know What He’s Doing

The 1st book of Kings begins in the most peculiar way possible. I mean I would be hard pressed to create a more bizarre situation. It begins with the old King David being cold and unable to get warm. So “Therefore his servants said to him, “Let a young woman be sought for my lord the king, and let her wait on the king and be in his service. Let her lie in your arms that my lord the king may be warm.” I swear I’m not making this up, this is what the Bible says. This sounds more like a cheap porno than the holy word of God. There’s something both comical and sleazy about an old man making up ridiculous excuses to get a young woman to sit on his lap. I don’t how this wasn’t removed from the Bible at a later date or burned as blasphemy. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The 1st Book of Kings: God Doesn’t Know What He’s Doing”

Imagine If There Was A God (And How This Shows There Isn’t One)

Imagine if there was a God. Now for some you, this is not asking anything much if you already believe in God, but for others it’s a stretch. Either way, hear me out. Imagine there was an all-powerful, all-loving God, who knew everything, created everything and could do anything. A God who spoke to humans, wanted us to prosper and wanted us to worship him. Imagine if everything they say in church is true, that you can achieve anything imaginable through faith and God. What would that look like? Continue reading “Imagine If There Was A God (And How This Shows There Isn’t One)”

An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book of Samuel: The Bizarre Justice Of God

The 2nd book of Samuel picks up where the 1st one finished, with David hearing of the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan. Upon hearing this, he and all his men tear off their clothes and start weeping. He is told this by an Amalekite, who for unexplained reasons was wandering through the battlefield when he started chatting to Saul (why? Shouldn’t they be enemies?), who asked him to kill him (despite the Bible just saying that Saul killed himself). So the Amalekite mercy kills the wounded Saul brings his crown to David. Why? Out of all the people in the land, why did the Amalekite choose David? Why not sell it or return to his own king? David thanks the stranger who gave him this crucial news and the crown by having him executed. Continue reading “An Atheist Reads The 2nd Book of Samuel: The Bizarre Justice Of God”