I’m In A Book!

I nearly fell out of my chair with shock when I read the e-mail asking me to write a chapter for a book on Ireland’s future. Twenty young people from all different areas were to present a vision for Ireland’s future and the wonderful Lou Hodgson thought (for some reason) that I had something to offer. Six months later, the first copy of the book has arrived and it will be in shops next week. Its called “New Thinking, New Ireland” and I still cannot believe I’m part of it. Continue reading “I’m In A Book!”

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The World The Day I Was Born

On my 21st birthday today I’m reflecting on how much the world has changed since the day I was born, October 21st 1991. Back then the Soviet Union still existed, the Troubles were still ongoing and Charles Haughey was Taoiseach. Homosexuality was illegal as was divorce. Old Ireland was on its last legs, we were still a white Irish Catholic country. Emigration was still common and unemployment was high (the more things change the more they stay the same). Immigration and multiculturalism had yet to arrive. The Catholic Church was still strong and the sex scandals had yet to hit. People still went to Mass. I was born right at the end of an era when the old ways were on their last legs. Continue reading “The World The Day I Was Born”

Blogs I’d Recommend

To celebrate my blog getting its 10,000th viewer I thought I’d make a list of all the blogs I have enjoyed. Too often blogs can be self-contained islands so it’s also good to reach out and find other views and connect with other people. While compiling this list I was sad to find that some blogs I really enjoyed are no longer active. So enjoy them while you can. Continue reading “Blogs I’d Recommend”

Review Of The Casual Vacancy

If you like epics, you’ll like The Casual Vacancy, author J.K. Rowling’s first book after the Harry Potter series. It is a story of a town rather than an individual. Rowling paints a broad canvass of many different intersecting lives set in a small English town. The plot revolves around the aftermath of the death of local councillor Barry Fairbrother. An election is held to fill his seat on the local parish council. It is set in a small town racked by division and conflict, between parents and children, husbands and wives, rich and poor. Then someone starts posting secrets onto the internet. . . Continue reading “Review Of The Casual Vacancy”